Waiver F.A.Q.

  1. If I have a criminal record can I enter the United States?
  2. What can happen if I try entering illegally?
  3. What is a waiver?
  4. I was refused admittance to the U.S. once because of my criminal record, but I need to try to get in anyway. What could happen?
  5. I travel to the U.S. and have not yet been detained, why do I need a waiver?

1. If I have a criminal record can I enter the United States?

No. Unless you are an American citizen or you have received advance permission from the USA Immigration Office, it is illegal for you to enter the U.S. with a criminal record.
2. What can happen if I try entering illegally?

You not only risk being denied entry, but you can be arrested, detained and deported. Customs agents may also confiscate your property and vehicle.
3. What is a waiver?

A waiver is a legal document issued by the Department of Homeland Security allowing you to travel to the United States without the risk of being refused entry.
4. I was refused admittance to the United States once because of my criminal record, but I need to try to get in anyway. What could happen?

If you are caught a second time, you risk having the vehicle you are traveling in, even if you are not the owner or driver, confiscated. You will also be arrested, detained and deported. It's much easier to get caught a second time because the US has its own files on you and your criminal record from the first time you were stopped, a computer search will reveal this information.
5. I travel to the United States and have not yet been detained, why do I need a waiver?

The law states that if you have a criminal record and you wish to enter the US, you need an Entry Waiver. You risk serious consequences if you're caught. All it takes is to get stopped once.